All Water is the Same, Right?


Everyone is concerned with their health and drinking more water, but how do icebergyou decide which water to drink? Today, we are going to look further at the various types of water that are available.

Reverse Osmosis

Reverse osmosis, or RO, water is water that has been purified using reverse osmosis techniques. Osmosis is something that occurs naturally, it’s when a solvent (something that is dissolved in a solution) passes through a semi-permeable membrane from an area where there is a lot of it, to an area that does not have a lot of that solvent.

In reverse osmosis, this process is basically, well, reversed. A reverse osmosis machine uses a semi-permeable membrane as a filter and it also uses a lot of pressure, more pressure than the normal process of osmosis creates. The product, RO water, is free of any impurities that might have been present before it went through the machine.

People use these machines to make sea water safe to drink, by removing all the salt. They also use them to purify water that is going to be used in very sensitive environments, such as coral tanks or other marine tanks.

Alkaline Ionized Water

What is Alkaline Ionized Water? Alkaline water is water with a pH of more than 7.0, normally between 8.5 to 9.5 pH for drinking. Some people buy alkaline water or an alkaline water machine because they believe drinking alkaline water has health benefits.

Ionized water (also referred to as electrolyzed water) is water that has been exposed to an electric current which separates the charged particles. During ionization, positively-charged ions are drawn to the negative electrode. Negatively-charged ions are drawn to the positive electrode. Ions with a positive charge like calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium raise the pH and produce alkaline water. Negative ions including phosphorous, chlorine, and sulfur lower the pH and produce acidic water.

Bottled Water

Bottled water is another choice for hydration and refreshment because of its consistent safety, quality, good taste and convenience.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) fully regulates bottled water as a packaged food product and requires bottled water to adhere to FDA’s extensive food safety, labeling and inspection requirements.

Bottled water is also subject to state regulations and, at the industry level, members of the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) are required to follow the IBWA Model Code.  Water is classified as “bottled water” or “drinking water” when it meets all applicable federal and state standards, is sealed in a sanitary container and is sold for human consumption.

By law, FDA standards for bottled water must be at least as stringent and protective of public health as standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for public water systems.  Some beverages containing certain ingredients or additives may cause that product to be classified as a soft drink, dietary supplement or some other categorization.

Soda water, seltzer water and tonic water are not considered bottled waters. They are regulated differently, may contain sugar and calories and are classified as soft drinks.

Distilled Water

Natural water usually contains a number of microscopic contaminants, along with dissolved minerals, such as calcium and iron. One way to remove these elements from water is to boil it until it changes to steam, a process known as distillation. When this steam is allowed to cool down and condense into liquid form again, the result is a purified form called distilled water. This water should ideally be nothing but hydrogen and oxygen molecules, with a pH level of 7 and no additional gases, minerals, or contaminants.

The distilling process relies on the principle that most solid materials found in water are heavier than the water molecules themselves. When water is heated in a distiller, any dissolved solids, such as salt, bacteria, calcium, or iron, remain solid while the pure water converts to a much lighter steam and is drawn out for condensation. Distilled water has a noticeably bland taste because all of the minerals that give water its flavor have been removed.

Distilled water is safe to drink, but it is used more often for research purposes where water purity is essential or industrial uses where mineral deposits can cause damage over time. It may also be used in steam irons to prevent calcium build-up, but this requirement has generally been relaxed in recent years. Certain baby formulas may use this type of water as a mixing liquid as well. Pediatric bottled water formulated with additional electrolytes may use it as a base.

Deionized Water

Deionized Water has had ionized impurities and minerals removed from it but not bacteria or pathogens.

Tap Water

Tap water is municipal water that comes out of the faucets and has been treated, processed and disinfected. It is purified with chlorine and generally has added fluoride. But one of the byproducts from using chlorine in our drinking water is linked to cancer.

Water: it makes up almost 75% of your body and is absolutely necessary for life. You probably know you should drink 8 to 10 glasses of this life-giving liquid per day, but have you given serious thought to the quality of your water?

Water is one of the most important parts of a healthy lifestyle, so make sure that you are choosing the best possible water, avoiding dangerous plastics, and getting enough vital minerals. With 8 to 10 glasses a day of pure water, you’ll have energy and vitality like never before.

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